Saturday, 27 May 2017

Benefits Of Lilac Oil And How To Make It

Lilac Oil


 This post is interesting as Lilac is in bloom at the moment.  It surprises me how versatile this oil is.

What Is Lilac Oil?

Lilac (Syringa) can refer to any of about 25 species of fragrant and beautiful garden shrubs and trees from the family Oleaceae. This plant is native to Eastern Europe and the temperate regions of Asia and are known to be hardy, easy-to-grow and low maintenance plants.

The common lilac, S. vulgaris, is the most popular and grows in temperate regions all over the world.1 The lilac plant has deep green leaves, leathery capsule-like fruits and oval clusters of colorful blooms. These flowers can come in different colors, such as purple, lavender, red, pink, creamy yellow and white. The plant can grow between 5 and 15 feet tall.

Lilac oil is usually pale purple, with a refreshing floral scent. A word of caution: Some lilac oils have synthetic fragrances that imitate the fragrance of lilacs, as the flowers actually cannot be distilled to make an essential oil.

Uses of Lilac Oil

The medicinal uses of lilac oil began in the 19th century. In America, it was  tused as a vermifuge to help eliminate intestinal worms, as well as an anti-periodic tonic (prevents diseases from occurring again).

Today, modern herbalists still use the essential oil of lilac to treat rashes, sunburn, minor cuts and scrapes and other skin ailments. It's also well-known for its aromatherapeutic uses.2 Lilac oil is a valuable addition to beauty products like lotions, soaps, shampoos and conditioners for its fragrance and calming effects. It is also added to cleaning products, as it adds a refreshing scent throughout your home.

Read On .................


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